News

Wed
14
Aug

WU Police tracking counterfeit money

West Union Police Chief Paul Becthold was visiting businesses last week warning them about counterfeit bills that were being circulated throughout the community. Here he points out some of the things to look for when determining whether a bill is counterfeit or not, to All Stop owner Casey McDermott.

 

WU Police tracking counterfeit money

 

By Jack Swanson
jswanson@fayettecountynewspapers.com

 

The West Union Police Department spent several days tracking down counterfeit bills that were circulating throughout the community.

According to Police Chief Paul Becthold, police received three different reports of counterfeit money being used in West Union.  He reported that all three of the incidents were at different businesses in the city limits of West Union.  

Wed
07
Aug

10 weeks, 30,000 acres, one bucket list experience

For two and a half months this summer, brothers Ryan and Derek Dietzenbach (l-r) of rural Festina worked for Snell Harvesting – a custom harvesting business located in Ellinwood, Kan. The young brothers each combined nearly 3,000 acres apiece as they worked for up to 20 hours a day and seven days per week in five different states. (Zakary Kriener photo)

 

10 weeks, 30,000 acres, one bucket list experience

 

Zakary Kriener

News Writer
zkriener@fayettepublishing.com

 

 

In northeast Iowa, an area that runs rich with agriculture, it is far from uncommon for young men and women to help during harvesting season by operating a combine. For rural Festina brothers Ryan and Derek Dietzenbach, they took harvesting to the next level as they spent 10 straight weeks of their summer behind the wheel of John Deere combines in the Great Plains region.

“This is something that we have always talked about doing since we were young,” said older brother Ryan. “As we got older, we would read stories in farming magazines about people who have done this and we just finally decided that it was time to do it for ourselves.”

Wed
07
Aug

Lehmann vies for State Fair Crown

The crown fits beautifully on Paige Kleve’s head as she sits on the Fayette County Fair Queen, Ryin Lehmann’s lap during the fair last month. Lehmann was off to Des Moines earlier this week to compete in the Iowa State Fair Queen contest.  (Submitted photo)

 

Lehmann vies for State Fair Crown

 

By Meagan Molseed
mmolseed@thefayettecountyunion.com

 

 

A host of thoughts were swarming through 18-year-old Ryin Lehmann’s mind as she stood on the bandstand stage at the Fayette County Fairgrounds, Tuesday, July 23.  

It was a perfect summer evening, as the crowd gathered under the shade in front of the iconic stage to cheer on some of Fayette County’s most accomplished young women, each vying for the Fayette County Fair Queen crown.

“I had gotten to know so many of the girls over the few days before the actual contest,” smiled Lehmann.  “Some of them I knew already, and others I just met.” 

The recent North Fayette Valley graduate remembers the moment on the stage, as time seemed to stand still.

Wed
07
Aug

Hawkeye council swears in new members

Hawkeye council swears in new members

 

Brian Smith
Contributing Writer

 

  The Hawkeye City Council has two new members as of Monday night’s city council meeting. Sara Schnur and Jeremy Eickhoff were added to the council, Schnur replacing Terry Buenzow and Eickhoff replacing Josh Hanson. Schnur and Eickhoff will serve the remainder of the terms for Buenzow and Hanson.
    Among the items of business discussed at Monday evening’s council meeting in Hawkeye was city ordinance 281 which involves implementing a sewer improvement fee of $20 per month. A public hearing was held during the meeting, but no residents provided any comments on the increase to the council, though two residents were present during the public hearing. The increase will begin showing up on residents’ utility bills this fall. 

Wed
07
Aug

Heaven's own wine available soon

Lisa Goodman welcomes visitors to Heaven. She and her husband, Carlton, opened the winery this May. Visitors can come in and try and buy all types of Iowa made wines. (Jack Swanson photo)

 

Heaven's own wine available

 

By Jack Swanson
jswanson@fayettecountynewspapers.com

 

 

 

“It was nice having you at Heaven.” 

“Thanks for visiting Heaven.”

“Welcome to Heaven.”

“It’s been a great week at Heaven so far.”

These are all phrases that Lisa Goodman has used in her daily business regime. No, she’s not an angel, at least not like the kind with wings and a halo, but she is the proprietor at Heaven Boutique Winery.

“Is this Heaven?” Goodman will be quick to answer, “Yes, it is.”

People who visit Heaven at 10408 Ivy Rd., can find 80 different kinds of wine from all over Iowa along with locally made arts and crafts. You can also stay in Heaven. “We offer unique, one-of-a-kind lodging,” she pointed out.

How did Goodman create Heaven? Well, according to her, it was there all the time, she and her husband, Carlton, just refined it a little bit.

Her roots in Heaven go back to her childhood when she remembers her mom and dad, Connie and Roger Halvorson, planting the first grape vines in 1999 on the property located near the west entrance of the Volga River State Recreation Area.

Wed
07
Aug

Success of fair continues to add up!

Success of fair continues to add up!

 

Zakary Kriener

News Writer
zkriener@fayettepublishing.com

 

 

It’s official. The 2019 Fayette County Fair will go down in the books as one of the most successful fairs in history! As figures and bills have continued to roll in for the past several days, the Fayette County Fair Board is beginning to get a clearer picture of just how successful this year’s event was.

“We won’t have the official figures until October, but we have a pretty good idea for most of the events,” said Justin Steinlage, Fair Board treasurer.

Throughout the five-day fair, the beer garden generated $13,432 in income – highlighted by its most successful night on Saturday (July 27) when it brought in $6,516 worth of sales.

After bills, the beer garden netted a total of $9,456.40.

Opening night numbers for the Fair were not yet available, but Steinlage was confident that the sweet corn, watermelon, and pork loin sandwich feed was a hit.

Wed
07
Aug

Annual WHOO ride August 17

Brandi (Vorwald) Burrow (back, right) was diagnosed with breast cancer last winter and is nearly halfway through her biweekly chemotherapy treatments.  Once those are complete, she will be receiving 33 treatments of radiation, Monday through Friday in Waterloo.  This years annual WHOO (We Help Our Own) ride will be in support of the busy mother and her family, (clockwise from top right) children, Rowen, Brandi, Jace, Leryn, Cael, Tylen, Ayden and Brandi’s husband Jeff.

 

Annual WHOO ride August 17

 

 

By Meagan Molseed
mmolseed@thefayettecountyunion.com

 

 

“I am really amazed by all of the help we have received,” Brandi (Vorwald) Burrow said softly.  “So many people have done so much to help us get through this, and I am so truly grateful.” 

As Burrow sits at the table, her voice still carries its usual vivacious resonance.  It’s only after talking for a little while that the tiredness begins to seep through her perky demeanor.   

“I try and keep going and sometimes that’s my only option,” said the mother of six, who was diagnosed with breast cancer just before Christmas last year.  “There are days I don’t feel like doing much, which is really out of character for me.” 

Burrow’s cheeks are flush with color, giving a striking pink contrast to her black head wrap, which she wears regularly after she began losing her hair, as a side effect to her cancer treatments, just a few months ago.

“It has worn me out, but not quite as bad as I thought it would,” said Burrow of her diagnosis as subsequent treatments.  “I have had so much help from people bringing me meals, sending me cards.  Even people I don’t know very well, have stepped up to help in some wonderful ways.” 

Two of those people are Mark and Rose Harberts of Elgin, the organizers behind one of our community’s valuable fundraisers, the annual WHOO (We Help Our Own) motorcycle ride.  

“They contacted me just last month and mentioned organizing the ride for me and our family,” Burrow said with a smile.  

“I am not someone to ask for help, and at first I wasn’t sure what to think about it,” she continued.  “When Mark and Rose told me who they have helped in the past, I felt like I was in good company and I was honored they thought of me.” 

Late last year, Burrow was preparing to open a second-hand shop in West Union while adjusting to life with two college-aged boys, a busy three-year old, and three boys right in between when she felt a lump in her right breast.

“Life is always busy,” the veteran mother said.  “The boys are running from one sport to the next, and trying to balance it all could be a bit tricky!  Sometimes it’s hard to find time for your own care.” 

While the lump did concern Burrow a bit, she quickly forgot about it as the school year progressed.

“I had a pain in my right breast for a little while, and that’s when I felt the lump,” she recalled.  “I thought I felt a similar lump on my left breast, so I decided it was no big deal.  Eventually the pain went away, so I just kind of forgot about it.” 

It wasn’t until a few months later, at her regular exam in December, that Burrow learned just exactly what the lump was.

“My doctor felt it almost immediately and asked if I’d noticed it before,” Burrow explained.  “I had kind of forgotten about it, but all of a sudden it was something I was worried about again. “

A biopsy was ordered and six days later the West Union woman heard the heartbreaking news.  She had breast cancer.

“I had a feeling,” she said quietly remembering the first time she heard her diagnosis.  “I’m normally a very optimistic person, but for some reason I just felt that it would come back with bad news.” 

The next few weeks were a blur for the Vorwald family as Brandi, her husband Jeff, and their four oldest children, Tylen, Jace, Cael and Ayden dealt with the diagnosis. 

The two youngest children, Rowen aged six and Leryn, age 4, were a little too young to grasp exactly what was happening.

“We didn’t want to confuse anyone,” said the doting mother.  “At that time, we weren’t sure what this all meant in the long run, so we decided to share the information with them as needed.” 

Upon her mastectomy, the doctors discovered two tumors, the larger one showed no signs or risk of spreading, the second, smaller one was concerning to the oncologists, showing high risk of spreading.

“It was at that point that we learned I would need to start chemotherapy, and then radiation,” said Burrow.  “It was definitely not what we had hoped to hear.” 

Wed
07
Aug

Things are looking bright at St. Peter's Church

Workers from Cathedral Crafts out of Winona, Minn., get started replacing the 28 stained glass windows in St. Peter Lutheran Church in Eldorado. The windows had been removed in March and transported to the Cathedral studio for restoration work. They arrived back last week.

 

Things are looking bright at St. Peter's Church

 

By Jack Swanson
jswanson@fayettecountynewspapers.com

 

Parishioners at St. Peter Lutheran Church in Eldorado will be finding it easier to see the light in the coming days.

The historic church with its iconic twin towers is in the process of having all of its 28 stained glass windows restored.

The project started in March when windows were removed from their housing with sashes intact and transported to Cathedral Craft Studio in Winona Minn., where the windows were repaired, restored and protected.

Last week the windows were returned to the church to begin the process of reinstallation.

For Cathedral Craft crew foreman Jason Petersen, the reinstallation is business as usual.

“This is a normal project. We usually do entire churches all across the Midwest. This is a typical early century church,” Petersen said of the structure built in 1911.

He related that Ford Brothers of Minneapolis, Minn., made most of the windows as evidenced by a label that is embossed in one of the windows.

“We see a lot of their work around this area. They were known for nice figurative painting and a lot of detail especially in faces and hands,” he pointed out.

The two windows at the back of the altar though are thought to be several years older and are a stenciled design rather than mosaic style. Church lore has it that the two windows actually came over from Germany before the main church was built.

Petersen, who also works in the studio, likens the restoration work to putting together a puzzle.

Wed
31
Jul

Wentholds proud to serve as king and queen

Ossian Senior Hospice resident Francis Wenthold (center) and wife JoAnn (right) will be the King and Queen of this year’s Ossian Fest grand parade. Pictured alongside granddaughter Olivia Wenthold, Francis and JoAnn will lead the annual parade, which will be held at 7 p.m. Saturday evening. (Zakary Kriener photo)

 

Wentholds proud to serve as king and queen

 

 

The annual Ossian Fest grand parade is one of the biggest and best parades in all of northeast Iowa. This year, when the parade makes its way down Main Street Ossian, parade-goers will be greeted first by Ossian Senior Hospice King and Queen Francis and JoAnn Wenthold.

The two longtime Ossian residents were chosen to represent Ossian Senior Hospice due to their dedication to both their local community and country.

Francis and JoAnn (Huinker) first met in 1954 when they both stood up in the same wedding.

Wed
24
Jul

Beer bottles and pot cans, oh my!

Old Mill Redemption sits empty after it shutdown operations on June 25 leaving no redemption centers in Fayette County and residents wondering what they are supposed to do with their redeemable empty bottles and cans. Iowa Code stipulates that any “dealer” who sells bottles and cans with a deposit needs to accept redemption of those empties. However, they have to be reasonably clean, dry, and intact, and local dealers can also place added restrictions on acceptance of empties. Chris DeBack photo

 

Beer bottles & pop cans, oh my!

 

By Chris Deback
cdeback@thefayettecountyunion.com

 

 

 

Residents of Fayette County have run into a bit of a problem when it comes to what to do with empty bottles and cans that can be redeemed. 

With the closing of Old Mill Redemption, which used to be located at the West Union Event Center and closed on June 25, there are no more redemption centers taking empty bottles and cans in Fayette County. 

“I did it for 13 years, and it was time to get out, as it just wasn’t profitable enough anymore,” said Wes Woods, who also closed a redemption center in Sumner. 

Old Mill is just the latest redemption center to close its doors in the area. Oelwein had two shut down operations this year including Oelwein Bottle and Can, which shut its doors on June 1st, and L&M Beverage. 

“I’m sorry, I don’t know where you will take your bottles and cans to redeem them,” said Oelwein Bottle and Cans’ voicemail.   

“L&M Beverage no longer takes empties, good luck out there with them,” said the companies outgoing message. 

The lack of a redemption center in Fayette County is putting a real strain on local businesses, especially here in West Union. Especially since, If an establishment sells bottles and cans that come with a 5-cent deposit when purchased, it legally has to take the empty bottles and cans back. If it doesn’t, the person trying to take them back can call the local police on the company and have it charged with a simple misdemeanor. 

However, that doesn’t mean that a person can return those cans and bottles in whatever condition he or she would like. Iowa Code stipulates that the bottles need to be reasonably clean, dry, and intact. 

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - News
Comment Here