News

Wed
26
Dec

New fuel farm provides economic opportunities for WU

 

Area pilot Bruce Lehmann (left) of Clermont is excited about the West Union Airport now offering fuel for sale, as he no longer has to go elsewhere to get fuel before taking off for his destination. Here, he gets a little help filling up his airplane from West Union Mayor Adam Keller.  Chris DeBack photo

 

New fuel farm provides economic opportunities for WU

 

 

By Chris Deback
cdeback@thefayettecountyunion.com

 

 

 

 

For years the West Union Airport was missing a critical piece to the flying process: fuel.

It goes without saying that an airplane can’t fly without fuel for its engines to consume, yet the airport didn’t have fuel for purchase. Local pilots who keep their planes in the hangar at the airport had to fly elsewhere to get fuel, and the City was missing out on an opportunity to get people to stop in town.

Wed
19
Dec

Turner, Dunn to highlight Winn. Co. Fair

Josh Turner with special guest Clare Dunn will play at the Winneshiek County Fair Saturday, July 13, at 7 p.m.

 

Turner, Dunn to highlight Winn. Co. Fair

 

 

Zakary Kriener

News Writer
zkriener@fayettepublishing.com

 

 

 

The Winneshiek County Fair Board is happy to announce that its complete Grandstand entertainment lineup for the 2019 Fair is now official as country music star Josh Turner and special guest Clare Dunn have come onboard.

Turner, whose most notable songs include “Hometown Girl,” “Your Man,” “Why Don’t We Just Dance,” and “Would You Go With Me,” will take to the stage at 7 p.m. Saturday night, July 13.

The opening act for Turner will be up-and-comer Clare Dunn, whose most notable song is “Tuxedo.”

Wed
19
Dec

The gift of advocating for a child

 

 

Everett Rowland of Clermont writes a report to the judge after meeting with his CASA (court-appointed special advocate) assignment and caseworkers at a staffing at Bremwood in Waverly on Dec. 13, 2018. (Vicki Rowland photo)

 

The gift of advocating for a child

 

 

Vicki Rowland
Contributing Writer

 

 

Going to court can be scary. Facing the somber rule of law is intimidating.  There is so much unknown.  And for some unfortunate children, it must be downright terrifying.

It would seem that some kids just have bad luck.  They may be born into a family wracked by drug or alcohol problems. Perhaps a parent has gotten into criminal activity or is abusive.  Or maybe it is just a really messed-up family relationship—perhaps the child is unwanted and unloved. This is a really sad thing to see happen.

Judges are not uncaring, but they do not see the child frequently. Social workers are overwhelmed. The child needs someone to look out for his or her interests – an advocate.  

That is where CASA comes in.  CASA stands for court-appointed special advocate. This is a volunteer for the court who is a liaison among the child, the judge, and all service workers who work with the child.  

Wed
19
Dec

The gift of helping our own

 

Mark and Rose Harberts of Elgin have long enjoyed their rides throughout northeast Iowa on Mark’s bikes.  A few years ago, they decided to share their love of the open road through fundraising efforts for a variety of area residents.  The annual WHOO (We Help Our Own) ride has raised tens of thousands of dollars to help area families with medical bills and other expenses.  (photo by Megan Molseed)

The gift of helping our own

 

By Meagan Molseed

mmolseed@thefayettecountyunion.com

 

 

 

“It truly is in the spirit of paying it forward,” said Rose Harberts earnestly.  “So many have benefited from this ride, and it has been very important to us to keep it going and going each year!” 

It started as a motorcycle ride to raise funds for the Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer foundation many years ago.

“We wanted to help someone who really needed it, and people in the area, including me and Rose, put together this bike ride,” remembered Rose’s husband, Mark Harberts, of the beginning of northeast Iowa’s own WHOO (We Help Our Own) annual motorcycle ride.  

Wed
19
Dec

Learn about conservation at the Courthouse

 

Fayette County Conservation recently turned the lounge on the first floor of the Fayette County Courthouse — across from County Social Services — into the Fayette County Pocket Nature and Visitor Center. Area residents visiting the courthouse can now learn a little bit about conservation while taking care of other obligations. Members of Fayette County Conservation that helped make it possible include Sam Hanson, Upper Iowa University intern; Rod Marlatt, Fayette County Conservation executive director; and Blake Gamm, Fayette County Conservation Roadside Vegetation manager, among others who are a part of the organization. Chris DeBack photo

 

Learn about conservation at the Courthouse

 

 

By Chris Deback
cdeback@thefayettecountyunion.com

 

 

 

 

The Fayette County Courthouse in West Union is a place where most of the business of the County takes place. People go there to get a driver’s license, pay their taxes, get a marriage license, and can listen in on a Fayette County Supervisors meeting, among other things. 

Now, you can also learn a little bit about conservation, as well. Fayette County Conservation recently turned the lounge on the first floor of the courthouse — across from County Social Services — into the Fayette County Pocket Nature and Visitor Center. People can relax in the lounge and read different conservation displays that have been set up. 

Wed
19
Dec

The Gift of Life: Brother donates kidney to save sister's life

 

A smiling Bruce Day and his sister Jeanna Woullet share a hug just after transplant surgery in which Bruce donated a kidney to Jeanna shortly after she was diagnosed with focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS). Submitted photo

 

The Gift of Life: Brother donates kidney to save sister's life

 

 

By Meagan Molseed
mmolseed@thefayettecountyunion.com

 

 

 

When Jeanna (Day) Wuollet first found out she had the kidney disease focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS), she had no idea what she would be facing over the next few years.

“I had been diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) years before this diagnosis,” the Arlington native explained.  “I was at a regular appointment with my RA doctor when they noticed my kidney was functioning poorly.  It was operating at about 13 percent of the normal level.” 

In May 2017, the oldest child of Mary (Derr) Day of Postville and the late Dave Day was sent to see a kidney specialist for further diagnosis. 

Wed
12
Dec

Former Ossian priest meets Pope Francis

 

Father Richard Kuhn holds a Seven Sorrows rosary as Pope Francis blesses it on Nov. 12. Kuhn intends to give the rosary to Our Lady of Seven Dolors Parish in Festina. (photo by The Vatican Media Services)

 

Former Ossian priest meets Pope Francis

 

 

By Father Richard Kuhn

 

 

 

Editor’s Note: This story is being republished courtesy of The Witness, the official publication for the Archdiocese of Dubuque. For more information, visit www.thewitnessonline.org.

On Thursday, Nov. 8, I flew from Dubuque to Chicago. Then it was nonstop, first class to Miami for overnight there. Father Jim McEvery, a classmate from Conception Seminary (Class of 1953) joined me. We were set to complete our celebration of 65 years of Catholic priesthood by shaking Pope Francis’ hand. Jim joined me the next day to board an Al Italia plane for an overnight ride to Rome!

Wed
12
Dec

Movement on Mill Street leaves a lot of potential for Clermont

 

Tanya Tysland has begun renovations on two buildings along Mill Street in Clermont. The building located to the southwest of T’s Brick City Spa (pictured at left), Krooked Halo’s new name, will be a drive-thru coffee shop and ice cream store, while the building (far right) to the southwest of Alesha’s Salon will be a brew pub. Chris DeBack photos

 

Movement on Mill Street leaves a lot of potential for Clermont

 

 

By Chris Deback
cdeback@thefayettecountyunion.com

 

 

 

 

Clermont is going to see some changes on Mill Street, aka Highway 18, with two new businesses and one existing business moving to downtown. 

Longtime business owner Jess Dean will be moving her chiropractic business, Dean Family Chiropractic, to 313 Mill Street. 

“Moving to Highway 18 has always been in the distant plans,” Dean said. “The space came open, it is in good shape, and it felt like it was a good fit. It was the late Bill Ashby’s apartment, and now we are turning it into an office.”

Wed
12
Dec

Movement on Mill Street leaves a lot of potential for Clermont

 

Tanya Tysland has begun renovations on two buildings along Mill Street in Clermont. The building located to the southwest of T’s Brick City Spa (pictured at left), Krooked Halo’s new name, will be a drive-thru coffee shop and ice cream store, while the building (far right) to the southwest of Alesha’s Salon will be a brew pub. Chris DeBack photos

 

Movement on Mill Street leaves a lot of potential for Clermont

 

 

By Chris Deback
cdeback@thefayettecountyunion.com

 

 

 

 

Clermont is going to see some changes on Mill Street, aka Highway 18, with two new businesses and one existing business moving to downtown. 

Longtime business owner Jess Dean will be moving her chiropractic business, Dean Family Chiropractic, to 313 Mill Street. 

“Moving to Highway 18 has always been in the distant plans,” Dean said. “The space came open, it is in good shape, and it felt like it was a good fit. It was the late Bill Ashby’s apartment, and now we are turning it into an office.”

Wed
12
Dec

Movement on Mill Street leaves a lot of potential for Clermont

 

Tanya Tysland has begun renovations on two buildings along Mill Street in Clermont. The building located to the southwest of T’s Brick City Spa (pictured at left), Krooked Halo’s new name, will be a drive-thru coffee shop and ice cream store, while the building (far right) to the southwest of Alesha’s Salon will be a brew pub. Chris DeBack photos

 

Movement on Mill Street leaves a lot of potential for Clermont

 

 

By Chris Deback
cdeback@thefayettecountyunion.com

 

 

 

 

Clermont is going to see some changes on Mill Street, aka Highway 18, with two new businesses and one existing business moving to downtown. 

Longtime business owner Jess Dean will be moving her chiropractic business, Dean Family Chiropractic, to 313 Mill Street. 

“Moving to Highway 18 has always been in the distant plans,” Dean said. “The space came open, it is in good shape, and it felt like it was a good fit. It was the late Bill Ashby’s apartment, and now we are turning it into an office.”

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